News / Events / Press

Cracks: The Hidden Defect

Cracks: The Hidden Defect

Cracks: The Hidden Defect Written By: John Maxwell Abstract: Cracks in ceramic chip capacitors can be introduced at any process step during surface mount assembly. Thermal shock has become a “pat” answer for all of these cracks, but about 75 to 80% originate from other sources. These sources include pick and place machine centering jaws, vacuum pick up bit, board depanelization, unwarping boards after soldering, test fixtures, connector insulation, final assembly, as well as defective components. Each source has a unique signature in the type of crack that it develops so that each can be identified as the source of error.

Equivalent Series Resistance of Tantalum Capacitors

Equivalent Series Resistance of Tantalum Capacitors

Equivalent Series Resistance of Tantalum Capacitors Written By: R.W. Franklin Abstract: The resistive losses which occur with all practical forms of capacitor are made up from several different mechanisms, including resistance in components and contacts, viscous forces within the dielectric and defects producing bypassing current paths. To express the effect of these various factors on the behavior of an electrolytic capacitor they are lumped together as one term, the equivalent series resistance (ESR).

Conduction and Failure Mechanisms in Barium Titanate Based Ceramics Under Highly Accelerated Conditions

Conduction and Failure Mechanisms in Barium Titanate Based Ceramics Under Highly Accelerated Conditions

Conduction and Failure Mechanisms in Barium Titanate Based Ceramics Under Highly Accelerated Conditions Written By: B. S. Rawal and N. H. Chan Abstract: Various mid-K and high-K barium titanate based laboratory compositions were studied to understand the conduction and failure mechanisms in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCs). These studies were utilized to establish the failure modes, the cause of failures, and determine the voltage and temperature acceleration factors. Current voltage plots were evaluated to study the endurance of the various ceramics under stress. These observations were employed to develop test conditions to screen commercial parts with one to two orders of magnitude lower failure rates and study production processes and types of ceramic materials to further improve the reliability of MLCs

Surface Mount Ceramic Resonators

Surface Mount Ceramic Resonators

Surface Mount Ceramic Resonators Written By: Phil Elliott Abstract: Ceramic resonators provide an attractive alternative to quartz crystals for oscillation frequency stabilization in many applications. Their low cost, mechanical ruggedness and small size often outweigh the reduced precision to which frequencies can be controlled, when compared to quartz devices. Ceramic resonators are now available in surface mountable packages suitable for automated production processes.

Comparison of Multilayer Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

Comparison of Multilayer Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

Comparison of Multilayer Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors Written By: Jeffrey Cain, Ph.D. Abstract: Engineers now have a choice between ceramic and tantalum when it comes to selecting capacitors with values between 0.1 – 22µF. As the ceramic material technology continues to advance, more and more capacitance is realized in the same case sizes compared to previous years. This paper will examine what devices are available and the trade off of using each of the technologies. The goal of this work is to help in selecting the proper device (tantalum versus ceramic) for a specific application.

Capacitor Array — An Integrated Passive Component Offering Benefits to the Automotive Sector

Capacitor Array — An Integrated Passive Component Offering Benefits to the Automotive Sector

Capacitor Array — An Integrated Passive Component Offering Benefits to the Automotive Sector Written By: Mark Stewart Abstract: By combining discrete capacitors into a multi-element package, AEC-Q qualified capacitor arrays offer automotive designers the opportunity to lower placement costs, increase assembly line output through lower component count per board and reduce real estate requirements.

The 3 Rs of IDCs: Reliability, Repeatability, Reparability

The 3 Rs of IDCs: Reliability, Repeatability, Reparability

The 3 Rs of IDCs: Reliability, Repeatability, Reparability Written By: Tom Anderson Abstract: Even after more than 50 years in the marketplace, insulation displacement connectors (IDCs) continue to prove themselves in new and demanding applications, such as automotive safety systems, solid-state lighting (SSL), and industrial sensors and controls. IDCs have provided a cost-effective and reliable alternative to crimp-to-wire and hard-soldering wires to a PCB.

Optimizing Antenna Performance Through the Use of High Q, Tight Tolerance Capacitors

Optimizing Antenna Performance Through the Use of High Q, Tight Tolerance Capacitors

Optimizing Antenna Performance Through the Use of High Q, Tight Tolerance Capacitors Written By: Ron Demcko Abstract: Antenna matching is an important aspect of any RF system. Thinking in traditional terms, a properly designed and matched antenna increases the operating distance of the wireless product. Well matched antennas can transmit more power from the radio – therefore transmit over longer distances. Likewise, a well matched antenna allows the maximum transfer of energy from the receiving antenna to the receiver front end. Thus, allowing better receive characteristics for the system. But the use of a capacitor can also have a big impact upon the physical size of an antenna. If the goal is a compact, integrated antenna, the use of a

Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor Holder For Ruggedized Automotive Applications

Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor Holder For Ruggedized Automotive Applications

Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor Holder For Ruggedized Automotive Applications Written By: Tom Anderson Abstract: Harsh environments such as automotive and industrial applications can be very demanding on larger electronic components, which are exposed to severe shock and vibration requirements. In order to protect these components, extra attention and most often times cost needs to be devoted to the processing and mechanical attachment within the device to the Printed Circuit Board (PCB).